NGS unique features – improving NodeJS require()

Background: what is NGS?

NGS, the Next Generation Shell is a (work in progress) shell and a programming language built ground up for systems engineering tasks. You can think of it as bash that’s designed today: sane syntax, data structures, functional programming, extensibility, cloud in mind, declarative primitives.

What’s good in NodeJS’ require()

I like most of how require() works in JavaScript. I’m not talking in this post about npm, just NodeJS require() function. require() does not pollute your namespace, you just get a reference, it’s simple to use and easy to reason about.

const a = require('cool-aws-wrapper');
// Can not be done easily with AWS SDK:
a.deleteRoute53Record('testing25.example.com');

What’s there to improve in require() ?

NodeJS modules are usually fall into one of the categories:

  1. Class definition / big library that manages it’s own namespace. These usually end with module.exports = MyClass. No problem here.
  2. Group of functions or classes. These usually end with module.exports = { func1, func2, func3, ...} lists (ES6 syntax, otherwise written as module.exports =  { func1: func1, ... } ) which I think are cumbersome.

How require() and modules look in NGS?

Note that require() in NGS is work in progress and it doesn’t have much of the functionality that NodeJS provides. I just started with things that bothered me the most.

Consistent with other places in NGS, require() returns the last evaluated expression. NodeJS for example returns module.exports which you must explicitly set as the result of require().

I think of modules primary as a namespaces. Creating a namespace in NGS has a syntax: ns { ... } .

Combining require() behaviour of returning last evaluated expression and namespace syntax, typical NGS module consists of single top level expression which evaluates to a namespace. The whole module file can look like this:

ns {

  global init

  type Vpc
  type Subnet

  F init(v:Vpc) {
    ...
  }

  F _helper_func(s:Str) { ... }

  MY_CONST = 42

  F ok() {
    echo("OK")
  }

}

Let’s ignore the global for now, it’s about how methods and types’ instances creation are implemented in NGS. Anything defined inside the ns { ... } is exposed as namespace member so usage of the above module could look like this:

{
  m = require('mymodule.ngs')
  vpc = m::Vpc()
  echo(m::MY_CONST)
  m::ok()
}

As you probably guessed, the :: operator is the namespace member access operator.

There is no need to explicitly state what module/namespace exports. That’s the improvement over NodeJS’ require().

How ns works and more options for the curios

ns { … } returns a Hash

As stolen from NodeJS, the namespace syntax (ns { ... }) returns a Hash. In NodeJS, require() typically returns JavaScript Object which is close enough for the purpose of this post.

About :: operator

The namespace member access operator :: is actually a Hash key access operator. It is helpful because the regular syntax for accessing members is not always a good fit for namespaces. The regular member access syntax is dot (.) but the dot syntax is also a function call: myobj.field – is a field/key/attribute access but myobj.func() is equivalent to func(myobj). For example, m::ok() will call the ok function defined in the module, m.ok() will call the function ok in current lexical environment with m as parameter.

As a bonus, since :: is an operator, it is implemented as function call. This means you can define how :: works with types that you define and modify how :: works with existing types.

ns { … } syntax implementation

For simplicity of implementation and absence of obvious reasons against, ns { ... } syntax is just a syntactic sugar for defining anonymous function without parameters and calling it immediately. The though behind this decision was simple: “I need to implement namespaces. Let’s see where I have them already. Oh, namespaces are already implemented in functions. This is so convenient, I can use this mechanism with minimal effort”.

How ns knows what to return?

ns is mostly a syntactic hack:

  1. Inside the ns body, the first statement, before any use-supplied statements is _exports = {} which sets the local variable _exports to an empty Hash.
  2. Any assignment and function definition also set _exports["something"]. MY_CONST = 42 becomes MY_CONST = 42;  _exports["MY_CONST"] = MY_CONST;
  3. Exception to the rule above are variables and functions with names starting with underscore (_). They are not automatically added to _exports. This for example is why _exports itself is not exported.
  4. Last statement, after all user-supplied statements is _exports.

The behavior I just described looks like sane defaults to me. As we all know, the life is usually more complex than hello world examples and customizations are need. Here are two ways to customize the resulting namespace.

  1. return your_expr – since ns is just a function, you can use return at any point to return your own custom namespace.
  2. manipulate _exports however you want towards the end of ns body. For example after _exports .= filterv(Type) only types will be exported. _exports.filterk(/^pub_/) will only export symbols (keys) that have names that start with pub_ .

Improvement suggestions are welcome! Have a nice day!

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